THE IMPORTANCE OF SPAY AND NEUTER

Every year millions of unwanted animals are euthanized in shelters. Beautiful healthy dogs and cats. These shelters are overcrowded and under funded and can't keep up with the constant intake, so many animals are simply dumped or left to spend their lives on chains in the most deplorable conditions. WE CAN CHANGE THIS by spaying and neutering our pets. It is actually healthier for them! And for many who can't afford the surgery there are organizations and clinics that will help to cover the costs. 

BELOW IS A CALCULATOR THAT SHOWS HOW MANY KITTENS CAN BE PRODUCED FROM 1 CAT. THE RESULTS ARE STAGGERING. 

1 CAT CAN PRODUCE OVER 49,000 CATS!!!

THE ONLY WAY TO REDUCE THIS IS BY SPAY AND NEUTER.


No matter how you do the math, there are too many cats/kittens and too few homes. This calculator attempts to (loosely) apply math calculations to scientific principles as they relate to cat reproduction. Taken into consideration are factors such as a high percentage of owned cats are neutered and a small percentage of feral cats are neutered. Also factored in are annual mortality rates as well as post-weaning survival rates of kittens.

At seven years, the calculator shows 2905 kittens at 7 years (versus 420,000) and 49,000 at 10 years. But no rationale person would think that 2905 kittens produced by one cat and her offspring in 7 years is acceptable. Responsible pet owners should spay or neuter their pets.

Factors:

The average mature cat can have 3 litters with a total of 12 kittens per year; 10.2 surviving kittens of which 4.7 are female
The average litter size is 4 kittens with 15% loss before reaching weaning age (3.4 kittens per litter)
Gender ratio per litter averages of males to females is roughly 46.5% female (of 3.4 kittens = 1.8 males and 1.6 females)
35% spay ratio allowance for offspring (unscientific factor balancing owned and stray cats)
20% annual mortality ratio
Not factored into this equation:

An immature cat's first litter usually consists of 2 kittens versus 4.
Unspayed female cats can begin reproducing at 6 months of age and can produce a litter during the same year of birth.
30% feral mortality
Year Female Cats Minus Died1
(@ 20% mortality) Minus Spayed2
(@ 35% spayed) Breeding Female Cats # Kittens Born # Surviving Post Weaning3 Surviving Female Kittens4
Year 1 0 - 0 - 0 1 female cat will have 12 kittens 10 will survive and 5 will be females
Year 2 6 - 1 - 2 3 female cats will have 31 kittens 26 will survive and 12 will be females
Year 3 15 - 3 - 5 7 female cats will have 79 kittens 67 will survive and 31 will be females
Year 4 38 - 8 - 13 17 female cats will have 203 kittens 172 will survive and 80 will be females
Year 5 96 - 19 - 34 43 female cats will have 519 kittens 442 will survive and 205 will be females
Year 6 247 - 49 - 86 111 female cats will have 1332 kittens 1132 will survive and 527 will be females
Year 7 633 - 127 - 222 285 female cats will have 3417 kittens 2905 will survive and 1351 will be females
Year 8 1623 - 325 - 568 730 female cats will have 8766 kittens 7451 will survive and 3465 will be females
Year 9 4164 - 833 - 1457 1874 female cats will have 22484 kittens 19112 will survive and 8887 will be females
Year 10 10680 - 2136 - 3738 4806 female cats will have 57672 kittens 49021 will survive and 22795 will be females
1http://www.animalsandsociety.org/assets/library/199_s15327604jaws07041.pdf
2http://catvet.homestead.com/devon_rex_project_report_1st_year.doc
3http://la.rsmjournals.com/content/4/1/99.full.pdf
4http://www.royalcanin.us/library/catlittersize.asp